Monday, January 24
The benefits of investing in cryptocurrencies in the long term

The benefits of investing in cryptocurrencies in the long term

Bitcoin is up 18% in the last 12 months. That's slightly worse than the 24% gain in Apple's share price and on par with the 18% gain in the S&P 500 index. Does this mean that Bitcoin (BTC) has become so widespread that its annual returns are on par with traditional stock investments? Not quite. Here is how BTC has performed over the past four years: Source: Revix Here's another way to look at it: If you bought and held BTC on any day since its inception and held it for five years, the worst annual return you'd have would be 27%. "That's a testament to the benefits of taking a long-term view of the cryptocurrency market," says Brett Hope Robertson, chief investment officer at crypto firm Revix. “This means that even if you bought at the worst time, but held it for five years, you still...
Sabvest Capital continues to deliver – Moneyweb

Sabvest Capital continues to deliver – Moneyweb

I have a filter that I apply to investment portfolio companies, the so-called HoldCos, to see if they are worth delving into: Is there an external management company (ManCo)? External ManCos can mean a misalignment of interests with shareholders. I want HoldCos where management is invested with other shareholders. How expensive is the HoldCo structure? How much additional cost does HoldCo's overhead insert between itself and the underlying investments? The cheaper the better. At what discount does it trade against its Net Asset Value (NAV)? This goes hand in hand with (2) above; the more expensive the HoldCo, the greater the discount should be. How are your unlisted assets valued? In addition to giving me peace of mind about HoldCo's asset base, unlisted asset valuations also reveal...
Living with Covid is difficult for a paralyzed world economy

Living with Covid is difficult for a paralyzed world economy

The growing omicron variant is complicating the recovery of a world economy that continues to be rocked by supply chain chaos, worker absenteeism and faltering assembly lines. Supermarkets are struggling to stock shelves amid chronic staff shortages. Airlines are canceling flights. Manufacturers are facing disruption and shipping lines remain supported. At the same time, rising energy prices are adding to inflation, putting pressure on central banks to raise interest rates even as the recovery slows. Optimists argue that omicron's economic impact will be limited as vaccines and boosters will allow the disease to progress from an acute to an endemic phase. US Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said she does not expect the variant to derail the US recovery. Nomura's analysis of the i...
Legal tools exist to protect South Africa’s urban ecosystems

Legal tools exist to protect South Africa’s urban ecosystems

The world is experiencing an environmental crisis along with rapid urbanization. This affects the city's ecosystems, which are a combination of the built environment, planned green spaces and natural biodiversity. They include streets, rooftops, parks, trees, rivers, and other urban features. ecosystems provide services such as regulation of air, water and soil quality. In cities, their role in climate regulation is particularly important. Cities are generally warmer than the surrounding rural areas. Greenery and vegetation mitigate this by providing shade and filtering the air. They also absorb greenhouse gases and other pollutants. But ecosystem services are under threat everywhere in the world. Urban development and sprawl lead to ecological degradation, pollution, and an ...
South African agriculture: new policy promises

South African agriculture: new policy promises

For most agricultural subsectors, South Africa is emerging from one of the best years. The 2020/21 season saw bumper harvests of cereals, oilseeds and some fruit. These boosted export earnings and improved farm incomes, especially for grains where the big harvest coincided with higher crop prices. When the current season started, 2021/22, promised to be exceptional. But the continuation of heavy rains have proven to be a challenge for several regions, causing damage to crops and delaying planting. The heavy rains of the new year are The girl induced and another year of above-average humidity follows. Various crop surveys have indicated a possible decline in harvests in 2021/22 as a result. Therefore, the coming year could be financially costly for the farming community if crop d...
2021 was one of the hottest years on record

2021 was one of the hottest years on record

Well, it's official: 2021 was one of the planet's seven hottest years since records began, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) declared this week. The year was about 1.11 ℃ above pre-industrial levels, the seventh year in a row that the average global temperature rise exceeded 1 ℃. The WMO report echoes two separate official US reviews released last week that found 2021 was the sixth hottest year on record, tied with 2018. However, for many of us in Australia and abroad, 2021 may have been colder and rainier than usual. This is due to the effect of consecutive La Niña events, a natural phenomenon that brings colder and rainier weather to our region. The fact that 2021 was one of the hottest years in the world despite these cooling forces shows how strong the long-term warm...
China installed record number of rooftop solar panels in 2021

China installed record number of rooftop solar panels in 2021

China put up a record number of solar panels on rooftops last year as growth in residential areas outpaced installations at solar farms. A total of 53 gigawatts of solar capacity was built in 2021, close to the all-time high set in 2017, with more than half coming from rooftop installations, according to the National Energy Administration. China now has 108 GW of rooftop solar, more than anywhere else, after adding 29 GW in 2021, the NEA said. Most of the additional capacity was installed in the fourth quarter as developers scrambled to meet the subsidy deadline. At the same time, larger-scale installations have stalled due to high costs and project delays. China's top industry body had earlier in the year estimated that total additions in 2021 could reach 65 GW, before being forc...
Crypto crash erases more than $1trn in market value

Crypto crash erases more than $1trn in market value

For Bitcoin, there's only been one constant recently: decline after decline after decline. And the superlatives have piled up really quickly. With the Federal Reserve intending to withdraw stimulus from the market, riskier assets the world over have suffered. Bitcoin, the largest digital asset, lost more than 12% Friday and dropped below $36,000 to its lowest level since July. Since its peak in November, it has lost over 45% of its value. Other digital currencies have suffered just as much, if not more, with Ether and meme coins mired in similar drawdowns. Bitcoin's decline since that November high has wiped out more than $600 billion in market value, and over $1 trillion has been lost from the aggregate crypto market. While there have been much larger percentage drawdowns for ...
Omicron pushes Japan to consider living With Covid like the flu

Omicron pushes Japan to consider living With Covid like the flu

Calls are growing in Japan to treat Covid-19 as endemic, adding to a global chorus pushing for a return to normal life as people tire of pandemic restrictions, vaccines become more accessible and virus deaths remain low. Drawing on data that shows omicron posing a less severe risk than previous variants, public figures from Tokyo's governor to former Prime Minister Shinzo Abe have signaled their support for downgrading the legal status of the virus in Japan. The change would widen health care access for patients, effectively casting the virus as no different than the flu. It is a debate playing out around the world, particularly in the West. Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez called on Europe to treat the virus as a constant of everyday life in a recent interview on the radio st...
Hitachi’s $18bn divestment campaign kept activists at bay

Hitachi’s $18bn divestment campaign kept activists at bay

Long before activist investors swarmed Japan to shake up loss-laden conglomerates and legacy assets, Hitachi Ltd. managed to do it on its own, selling more than $18 billion worth of businesses in the past five years under the leadership from CEO Toshiaki Higashihara. The result? A market value that has more than doubled to 6.2 trillion yen ($54 billion), second only to the Sony Group among Japanese electronics manufacturers and roughly equal to the next two competitors, Panasonic and Mitsubishi Electric, combined. “The activists have never told us anything,” Higashihara, 66, said in an interview at Hitachi headquarters across from Tokyo Station. Since taking office in 2016, the rail systems engineer has been credited with transforming a sprawling conglomerate, once the country's b...