Wednesday, January 26

De Klerk apologizes for apartheid


Former South African President FW de Klerk, who died Thursday at age 85, apologized for crimes against people of color in a video posted by his foundation on its website hours after his death.

Read: Obituary: De Klerk of SA negotiated the end of the white rule

“I unreservedly apologize for the pain and the pain and the indignity and the damage that apartheid has done to blacks, brunettes and Indians in South Africa,” de Klerk said.

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In his message he also warned that the country faces many challenges of a serious nature, saying: “I am deeply concerned about the undermining of many aspects of the Constitution, which we perceive almost day by day.”

It was not immediately clear when the recording took place.

Here is the full text of his recorded message to the people of South Africa

“This is my last message addressed to the people of South Africa. To my dear wife and family, I will say goodbye in a different way.

“Our country faces so many serious challenges. I have strong opinions on all of them, but I decided to keep this message very brief and only really focus on two issues: touching myself and touching the country.

Before I do so, I would like to thank all my friends and supporters for the wonderful support and encouragement they have given me throughout my life. And throughout my political career. Many of them were close to me, even for decades, others intervened occasionally. I thank you for your support and your trust in me. I thank you for your friendship. Thank you for carrying me on your shoulders for so many years.

“The first issue I want to focus on is apartheid, and apartheid and me.

“I am often still accused by critics that, in one way or another, I continue to justify apartheid or separate development, as we later prefer to call it. It is true that in my youth I advocated separate development because I never liked the word apartheid. I did it when I was a member of Parliament and I did it when I became a member of the cabinet.

“Subsequently, on many occasions, I apologized for the pain of indignity that apartheid has brought to people, to people of color in South Africa. Many believed me, but others did not. Therefore, allow me today, in this last message, to repeat.

“I unreservedly apologize for the pain and the pain and the indignity and the damage that apartheid has done to blacks, brunettes and Indians in South Africa. I do so not only in my capacity as a former leader of the National Party, but also as an individual.

“Let me in this last message share with you the fact that since the early 1980s, my views have completely changed. It was as if he had a conversion. And deep in my heart, I realized that apartheid was wrong. I realized that we had come to a morally unjustifiable place.

“My conversion, to which I refer, did not end with the admission to me of the utter unacceptability of apartheid. He motivated us in the National Party to take the initiatives we have taken since I became the leader of the National Party. And more specifically, during my presidency.

“We not only admitted the injustice of apartheid, but we took far-reaching steps to ensure negotiation and a new administration that could bring justice to all.

“This brings me to the second issue I want to focus on.

“Along with most of the others South Africans, I am proud of our Constitution. The Constitution that we elaborated in the negotiations that we began in 1990 and that culminated in the final constitution of 1996. I really associate myself with the values ​​and principles enshrined in our Constitution, and I am deeply concerned about the undermining of many aspects of the Constitution, which we perceive almost day by day.

“It is my request that the government, all parties, civil society and all South AfricaThe NS must re-embrace the Constitution and interpret it in the balanced way required by the Constitution.

“We need to align the principles of non-racism and non-discrimination with the need to deal with the past and issues like affirmative action.

“We need to ensure the independence and impartiality of our courts.

“We need to promote economic growth and job creation basing economic policies on the principles contained in the Constitution, and not on ideologies, which militate against the Constitution.

“We need to make the Constitution the cornerstone of the new society we are building.

“The way forward is difficult. But I firmly believe that if we hold hands and if all reasonable people in South Africa put their heads together, we can overcome the challenges we face and we can fulfill the tremendous potential that South Africa have.

“Can the South African nation shows the courage and ingenuity to do it. ”


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